Tom Hardy, divas, music and my polishes ;))

18th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from This is a Problem with 25 notes

thas-fandom:

The Drop | NY Premiere (Sept 8)

At the NYC premiere of THE DROP star Tom Hardy says he really doesn’t have a method to his acting and he’s constantly thinking what’s for lunch. The English actor is also joking about his “bad” Brooklyn accent in THE DROP. Watch Justine Browning’s interview with the eclectic actor.

Interview (video)

I’ve posted the two last photos before, here

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interview

Source: thas-fandom

8th September 2014

Video reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 67 notes

charlidos:

A ‘junket interview’ with Tom and Noomi for The Drop. They’re funny together. :)

Tagged: Tom HardyNoomi Rapactom hardy interview

8th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 65 notes

charlidos:

An interview with Tom from Entertainment Weekly. ‘I’m a huggie kind of guy’ - got to love him.

EW: I remember for your character of Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, part of the inspiration for his very distinct voice was a Romanian brawler, right?TOM HARDY: Bartley Gorman, who was a Romani gypsy. He’s of Irish descent, but he was a Traveller in the British Isles. 
So I’m curious where you started looking for Bob’s voice, because not only is it a certain flavor of Brooklyn, but the delivery itself is very distinct.Sean Penn in We’re Here No Angels. There’s one line that he said, “Sometimes you’re a stranger too.” There’s a line when he’s in the pulpit giving a speech as a priest. I remember that sound. That was a sound that was key to Bob for me, to a certain level. And I suppose [I incorporated] traces of old ’70s American east-coast movies, and then also trying too find a voice that was coming out of the darkness, and trying to find itself. So there’s an element of mumbling and apology. There’s an apologetic tone to it that was key. 
You’ve played a collection of tough guys in the past, most notably, perhaps Bronson, but in The Drop, you’re sharing the screen with Tony Soprano. And James Gandolfini has such presence associated with that character in particular. When two actors like yourself collaborate, is there a certain amount of circling each other first? Or is it a handshake and you just got to work? It starts with a hug. I’m a huggie kind of guy. Jimmy had a big heart, and also, he knew some friends of mine, like Brett C. Leonard, who writes for the LAByrinth Theater company a lot, and Phil (Seymour Hoffman) was a good friend of mine as well. It’s that world. I’m from London, a million miles away, but I’ve found a lot of kindred spirits in New York City—people from the LAByrinth, like [The Drop’s] John Ortiz and Elizabeth Rodriguez. And Jimmy was of that world. So it wasn’t Tony Soprano; it was about an artist. And meeting Jimmy came through friends, who said, “You’re going to love him, because he’s got a massive heart.” And he’s very very sensitive, he’s very intelligent, he’s very funny, and he’s very kind.” So I didn’t have any of that [Tony Soprano aura] in my head. The key magnetism came from a kindred spirit of, “I really give a f–k about the work,” and I know he does too, and I love him. I just wanted to please him with the work. 
The more tense the scene gets, the quieter Bob seems to become. Was that always how you read the character or was that a specific decision on your part, that he slows things down when things are speeding up?Well, there’s always quiet before something really serious happens. It’s just dramatic effect, isn’t it? A great act of violence normally happens with [snaps fingers] completely and just disappears before anyone even knows that it’s happened. So that’s kind of the terrain we’re playing with with a character like Bob. He has to listen a lot and read the terrain, and all of that [quiet] is in tune with the symptom of somebody who wants to be invisible. He has to gauge and read what the threat is—the symptom of that is in language or listening or reacting, ascertaining and gauging just how serious somebody else is. And when that point is that you have to do something about it and how. 
You have Mad Max coming out next year, adding another dark and dangerous character to your resume. But there’s also Elton John on the horizon. Is he a tough guy too?Yeah, he is, actually. Somewhere between Bronson and Billy Elliot? [Laughs] And Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. And The Pianist. He’s a very very interesting and unique individual. And that’s a case file that is open and taking it’s time to grow and ruminate and meditate on. 
You’ve worked on huge blockbuster productions before, like Batman and Inception, but Mad Max will be your baby. Can you ever prepare yourself for something like that? What do you mean? 
Well, just the extra attention and responsibilities that go with a huge franchise that has decided you are its face. Just go with it. See what happens. With anything, you’re part of an ensemble. And it’s George Miller’s character. Mad Max belongs to George Miller. The whole world belongs to George Miller, he created it. And its 30 some years in the making, the latest Mad Max. And it’s not like some other director who’s taken up the mantle undecided that he’s going to deliver his version of events. It’s a continuation of George Miller’s meditations on where he’s at now with the assets that he has available to him. So very much I get on the ride, as part of being a small cog in a much grander tapestry of a man’s life work, actually. So it’s an honor to be part of that and circumstance would have it that I’ve been chosen to play Max, so I’m very grateful for that. It’s a resurgence of that, a continuation of the work that is already there, by the guy who created it in the first place. I don’t really now what the output is. What the fallout… I don’t really dwell on that. Just play my part. Get on with it. Move on. And hopefully they’ll be more [Mad Max films].

charlidos:

An interview with Tom from Entertainment Weekly. ‘I’m a huggie kind of guy’ - got to love him.

EW: I remember for your character of Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, part of the inspiration for his very distinct voice was a Romanian brawler, right?
TOM HARDY: Bartley Gorman, who was a Romani gypsy. He’s of Irish descent, but he was a Traveller in the British Isles.

So I’m curious where you started looking for Bob’s voice, because not only is it a certain flavor of Brooklyn, but the delivery itself is very distinct.
Sean Penn in We’re Here No Angels. There’s one line that he said, “Sometimes you’re a stranger too.” There’s a line when he’s in the pulpit giving a speech as a priest. I remember that sound. That was a sound that was key to Bob for me, to a certain level. And I suppose [I incorporated] traces of old ’70s American east-coast movies, and then also trying too find a voice that was coming out of the darkness, and trying to find itself. So there’s an element of mumbling and apology. There’s an apologetic tone to it that was key.

You’ve played a collection of tough guys in the past, most notably, perhaps Bronson, but in The Drop, you’re sharing the screen with Tony Soprano. And James Gandolfini has such presence associated with that character in particular. When two actors like yourself collaborate, is there a certain amount of circling each other first? Or is it a handshake and you just got to work?
It starts with a hug. I’m a huggie kind of guy. Jimmy had a big heart, and also, he knew some friends of mine, like Brett C. Leonard, who writes for the LAByrinth Theater company a lot, and Phil (Seymour Hoffman) was a good friend of mine as well. It’s that world. I’m from London, a million miles away, but I’ve found a lot of kindred spirits in New York City—people from the LAByrinth, like [The Drop’s] John Ortiz and Elizabeth Rodriguez. And Jimmy was of that world. So it wasn’t Tony Soprano; it was about an artist. And meeting Jimmy came through friends, who said, “You’re going to love him, because he’s got a massive heart.” And he’s very very sensitive, he’s very intelligent, he’s very funny, and he’s very kind.” So I didn’t have any of that [Tony Soprano aura] in my head. The key magnetism came from a kindred spirit of, “I really give a f–k about the work,” and I know he does too, and I love him. I just wanted to please him with the work.

The more tense the scene gets, the quieter Bob seems to become. Was that always how you read the character or was that a specific decision on your part, that he slows things down when things are speeding up?
Well, there’s always quiet before something really serious happens. It’s just dramatic effect, isn’t it? A great act of violence normally happens with [snaps fingers] completely and just disappears before anyone even knows that it’s happened. So that’s kind of the terrain we’re playing with with a character like Bob. He has to listen a lot and read the terrain, and all of that [quiet] is in tune with the symptom of somebody who wants to be invisible. He has to gauge and read what the threat is—the symptom of that is in language or listening or reacting, ascertaining and gauging just how serious somebody else is. And when that point is that you have to do something about it and how.

You have Mad Max coming out next year, adding another dark and dangerous character to your resume. But there’s also Elton John on the horizon. Is he a tough guy too?
Yeah, he is, actually. Somewhere between Bronson and Billy Elliot? [Laughs] And Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. And The Pianist. He’s a very very interesting and unique individual. And that’s a case file that is open and taking it’s time to grow and ruminate and meditate on.

You’ve worked on huge blockbuster productions before, like Batman and Inception, but Mad Max will be your baby. Can you ever prepare yourself for something like that?
What do you mean?

Well, just the extra attention and responsibilities that go with a huge franchise that has decided you are its face.
Just go with it. See what happens. With anything, you’re part of an ensemble. And it’s George Miller’s character. Mad Max belongs to George Miller. The whole world belongs to George Miller, he created it. And its 30 some years in the making, the latest Mad Max. And it’s not like some other director who’s taken up the mantle undecided that he’s going to deliver his version of events. It’s a continuation of George Miller’s meditations on where he’s at now with the assets that he has available to him. So very much I get on the ride, as part of being a small cog in a much grander tapestry of a man’s life work, actually. So it’s an honor to be part of that and circumstance would have it that I’ve been chosen to play Max, so I’m very grateful for that. It’s a resurgence of that, a continuation of the work that is already there, by the guy who created it in the first place. I don’t really now what the output is. What the fallout… I don’t really dwell on that. Just play my part. Get on with it. Move on. And hopefully they’ll be more [Mad Max films].

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interview

8th September 2014

Video reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 166 notes

charlidos:

Tom Hardy interviewed by Vanity Fair. Talking about Titanic. And beards. Heh.

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interviewvideo

7th September 2014

Video reblogged from tom hardy variations with 90 notes

charlidos:

Interview with Tom, Noomi, Matthias, Michael Roskam and Dennis Lehane from Variety. 

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interviewNoomi Rapacvideo

Source: charlidos

7th September 2014

Video reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 67 notes

charlidos:

An little group interview with Tom, Noomi, Matthias and Michael Roskam. And Bill Murray… Sort of.

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interviewvideoNoomi Rapac

15th May 2014

Photoset reblogged from tom hardy variations with 736 notes

"And there should be no difference to your input, the output is up to somebody else. So the process, it changes and whatever it takes to get there, but the work is the work and that’s really, bottom line what it is, I’m just grateful to be working. So when you meet people who are super talented, then it doesn’t matter what form it is. If you have the time, you do the job."

[x]

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interview

Source: kinghardy

5th May 2014

Photo reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 40 notes

charlidos:

From ABC news:

Asked by the Wall Street Journal if the fact that he’s starring in the movie, Rocketman, means he’ll be singing Elton’s biggest hits, Hardy replied, “Yeah, I hope so…But that’s terrifying me. I can’t hold a tune to save my life. God knows how I’m going to do that.” But when asked to confirm that he really can’t sing, Hardy told ABC News Radio, “It sounds more interesting to believe somebody who can’t sing is playing Elton John, doesn’t it? So, I try to be interesting wherever possible.”
Hardy continues, “I’m not very interesting. So, it’s one of those marketing ploys. ‘The guy can’t sing. He’s going to play Elton. He’s bound to fail,’ you know, that kind of thing.”
OK, so Hardy can sing. But that doesn’t mean portraying one of music’s all-time greats is going to be a walk in the park for him, either. Hardy, who’s best known for his roles in Inception and The Dark Knight Rises — he memorably played Bane, the villain, in the latter movie — says he agreed to star in Rocketman precisely because it’s going to be a challenge.
“You know, I have to say yes, because it’s something that I don’t think I can do, and that’s exciting, and it’s out of my comfort zone,” he tells ABC News Radio. “Because…you know, Elton John is so specifically Elton John and I’m not him. So, I’m drawn toward that which I think I will probably fail at doing. And then there’s some level of, sort of, pleasure in trying to dig myself out of the hole.”

charlidos:

From ABC news:

Asked by the Wall Street Journal if the fact that he’s starring in the movie, Rocketman, means he’ll be singing Elton’s biggest hits, Hardy replied, “Yeah, I hope so…But that’s terrifying me. I can’t hold a tune to save my life. God knows how I’m going to do that.” But when asked to confirm that he really can’t sing, Hardy told ABC News Radio, “It sounds more interesting to believe somebody who can’t sing is playing Elton John, doesn’t it? So, I try to be interesting wherever possible.”

Hardy continues, “I’m not very interesting. So, it’s one of those marketing ploys. ‘The guy can’t sing. He’s going to play Elton. He’s bound to fail,’ you know, that kind of thing.”

OK, so Hardy can sing. But that doesn’t mean portraying one of music’s all-time greats is going to be a walk in the park for him, either. Hardy, who’s best known for his roles in Inception and The Dark Knight Rises — he memorably played Bane, the villain, in the latter movie — says he agreed to star in Rocketman precisely because it’s going to be a challenge.

“You know, I have to say yes, because it’s something that I don’t think I can do, and that’s exciting, and it’s out of my comfort zone,” he tells ABC News Radio. “Because…you know, Elton John is so specifically Elton John and I’m not him. So, I’m drawn toward that which I think I will probably fail at doing. And then there’s some level of, sort of, pleasure in trying to dig myself out of the hole.”

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interview

28th April 2014

Video reblogged from tom hardy variations with 48 notes

tomhardyvariations:

10 Things We Learned from Tom’s AMA

Reddit AMA (ask me anything) livechats can be hit and miss, but I think Tom and Steven Knight gave thoughtful, candid and funny replies while in the hotseats this week for their film Locke. That’s despite the session being engulfed by 4chan pranksters slinging Bane quotes masquerading as questions. Ha. Tom was his usual charming self and his straight-talk was as refreshing and bs-free as ever. Here are 10 forthright answers.

 _______________________________________________ 

1. He wishes more people knew he’s not crazy.

Q: What’s something you wish more people knew about you? 
A: That I’m not crazy. I’m actually not crazy, that I genuinely care. And I’m actually rather pedestrian, and genuinely honest.
_______________________________________________ 

2. He was slugging shots of Beechams (cold med) while filming Locke.

Q: Was there any stuntwork in Locke?
A: There were no stunts. I drank my own Beechams, which is like Dayquil.
 _______________________________________________ 

3. The man on whom he based his Welsh accent in Locke is not actually Welsh.

A: I met a man who I based Ivan Locke upon. He had very similar characteristics, he was calm and effective under duress, took me around Kabul for a week. And then I found out after I based the character on him, this week in fact, just yesterday, he’s not Welsh. We don’t know what he was. Which would explain my poor accent.
 _______________________________________________ 

4. Crepes over waffles.

Q: What are your thoughts on pancakes vs waffles?
A: Seriously? When somebody waffles, they talk a lot of shit, and a pancake is something you can eat. I’d go for a crepe.
_______________________________________________ 

5. He won’t work with the director of Bronson again.

Q: Bronson is one of my favorite films and characters. Do you plan on doing any more work with Refn?
A: No, I don’t plan on ever doing any work with Refn again. I think he’s better off where he is, doing well without me.
 _______________________________________________ 

6. While Tom was filming Locke, his dog Woodstock morphed into a donkey.

Q: Something interesting that happened during the filming of Locke?
A:  My dog would work the catering line every evening. He put on about 3 stone in 5 days. That’s about 90 pounds. I went with a Labrador, I came home with a donkey.
 _______________________________________________ 

7.  As a director, he’ll never ask actors to do something he can’t do himself.

A: Directing has absolutely been an interest. I wouldn’t ask somebody to do something that I couldn’t do myself, and I love drama. I love playing characters. So for me, directing is more about storytelling than technical application, so I’d obviously delegate to a team that knows better than me how to do that, but I’d love to direct.
_______________________________________________ 

8. He quit twitter because the trolls made it un-fun.

Q: Why did you delete your Twitter account (twice!)?!
A: I deleted my twitter account because they’re unmanageable and they become a place of harassment and not as much fun as I would have liked it to be.
_______________________________________________  

9. Gerard Butler smells uniquely…Scottish.

Q: My question is, what attracts you to roles where you have to go beast? Also, you slow danced with Gerard Butler. What does he smell like?
A: Beastiality. And Gerard smells Scottish.
_______________________________________________ 

10. He’d eat through his own underpants to work for Chris Nolan

A: Chris Nolan is…wow. Chris Nolan is the grandmaster of orchestrating huge multifaceted movies and storytelling with visual effects and technical wizardry, right down to the finest detail. If he asked me to read a shopping list off the back of a flipflop, I would eat through my own underpants to get to him. That’s what it was like.

###

Extra: Asked if people shout Inception or The Dark Knight Rises quotes at him, and whether it gets annoying (heh), Tom said: “No they don’t, and I imagine it would get annoying. But I would deal with it with grace and compassion.”

And to all, a good weekend!

Tagged: Tom Hardytom hardy interview

Source: tomhardyvariations